by Birth 

When Malta became an Independent State on 21st September 1964, the Independence Constitution established who would be entitled to an automatic claim to Maltese citizenship by either birth or descent and who may register as a citizen of Malta. The relative provisions of the Constitution regarding citizenship legislation were further complemented in 1965 with the enactment of the Maltese Citizenship Act (Cap 188). Later, in the year 2000, the provisions concerning the abovementioned citizenship matters, were removed from the Constitution and included in the Maltese Citizenship Act (Cap 188).

Who became a citizen of Malta automatically with Malta’s Independence?

Persons who were:

  • Born in Malta before 21stSeptember 1964 and at least one of their parents was born in Malta; OR
  • Born abroad but his/her father and a paternal grandparent were both born in Malta; &
  • On 20th September 1964 they were still citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies.

Who automatically acquired Maltese citizenship by birth between 21st September 1964 and 31st July 1989?

Persons who were:

  • Born in Malta during the said period provided that their father, who was not himself a citizen of Malta, did not enjoy diplomatic immunity in Malta; OR
  • Born abroad during the said period and at the time of birth, their father was a citizen of Malta by birth (in Malta) or by naturalisation or by registration.*

*Maltese citizenship shall not be transmitted to the child of a person who had acquired Maltese citizenship by registration on the basis of descent.

Who became a citizen of Malta by birth on or after 1st August 1989?

Persons who were:

  • Born in Malta during the said period provided that their father, who was not himself a citizen of Malta, did not enjoy diplomatic immunity in Malta; OR
  • Born abroad during the said period and at the time of birth, their father was a citizen of Malta by birth (in Malta) or by naturalisation or by registration.*

*Maltese citizenship shall not be transmitted to the child of a person who had acquired Maltese citizenship by registration on the basis of descent.

Was it or is it possible for a person who had acquired Maltese citizenship by birth or descent to retain his/her Maltese citizenship together with that of another citizenship he/she had obtained or retained?

Until 31st July 1989, this was not possible and important changes to the said legislation were later made in 2000. Dual or multiple citizenship has now become the rule rather than the exception.

As of 10th February 2000, a citizen of Malta could acquire and retain a foreign citizenship/s along with his/her Maltese citizenship.

Application Forms

Applicants would need to fill in:

  1. CEA 3 – Form D
  2. CEA 6 - Dual A
  3. CEA 17 - Dual B

by Registration after Marriage

When Malta became an Independent State, the Independence Constitution established who could register as a citizen of Malta under the provisions of the same Constitution. Following amendments to Maltese Citizenship legislation in 2000, the provisions concerning the registration of persons as citizens of Malta were removed from the Constitution and included in the Maltese Citizenship Act (Cap 188).

On 1st August 2007, there were further amendments to the said Act which made it possible for second as well as subsequent Maltese generations born abroad to acquire Maltese citizenship by registration.

Who can apply for citizenhsip by registration?

Persons who were:

A person who is the:

  • Spouse of a Maltese citizen married for at least five (5) years and on the date of application is still married and living with that citizen of Malta (Form B);
  • Widow/widower of a person who was a citizen of Malta at the time of his/her death and the widow/widower had been married and living with the now deceased person for at least five (5) years (Form B);
  • The widow/widower of a person who was a citizen of Malta at the time of his/her death, and if not for the death of the person, the widower/widower would have been married to that person for five (5) years on the date of application (Form B);
  • Widow/widower of a person who passed away before 21st September 1964 and if it were not for his/her death he/she would have automatically become a citizen of Malta (due to the fact that he/she was born in Malta of a parent born in Malta too or was born abroad of a father and a paternal grandparent who were both born in Malta) and the widow/widower was still living with the deceased person at the time of his/her death (Form B).
  • Son/daughter born prior to 21st September 1964 of a female born in Malta and who became or would have become, but for her death, a citizen of Malta on the said date (Form I);
  • Son/daughter of a female citizen of Malta (who acquired Maltese citizenship by birth in Malta, and who was a citizen of Malta at the time of the son’s/daugher’s birth) and was born outside Malta on or after 21st September 1964 and before 1st August 1989 (Form I);
  • Former citizen of Malta and does not qualify automatically for dual citizenship because he/she had not resided for a minimum of six (6) years abroad or was formerly a citizen of Malta by Registration or by Naturalisation (Form D);
  • Descendant, second or subsequent generation, born abroad of an ascendant born in Malta whereby one of the parents of the said ascendant was also born in Malta. If the descendant is a minor, then the person who has authority over the said minor shall submit the relative application on his behalf (Form K \ Form M).

What documents are required?

  1. A joint Affidavit confirming that the applicant and the Maltese spouse have been married for 5 years and still living together;
  2. One recent passport sized photo;
  3. Marriage certificate (Registered in Malta);
  4. Certificate/s of previous marriage/s of both applicant and the Maltese spouse;
  5. Full birth certificate;
  6. Passport / ID card / residence card of the applicant and of the Maltese spouse;
  7. The date of birth of the parents of the Maltese spouse;
  8. In case of a widow/widower of a citizen of Malta, the following documents must be presented:
    • The late spouse’s death certificate; and
    • Affidavit that couple resided together till time of death.
  9. The application may be submitted against a fee of €150. If the application is acceded to, a further €50 has to be paid upon collection of Citizenship certificate at the end of the process. Original documents will be returned to the applicant. Copies will be retained.
  1. Passport;
  2. Birth certificate;
  3. Marriage certificate (if applicable);
  4. Birth certificate of applicant’s parents;
  5. A letter stating why the applicant cannot provide 6 years documentary evidence of residence abroad or a copy of the Maltese Citizenship Renunciation letter;
  6. One passport size photo; and
  7. A copy of the applicant’s certificate of acquisition of the citizenship he/she now holds.
  1. Birth certificate showing parents’ names;
  2. Marriage certificate of applicant (if applicable);
  3. Passport;
  4. One passport size photo;
  5. Birth certificate of applicant’s mother;
  6. Mother’s Marriage certificate;
  7. Mother’s passport;
  8. Birth certificates of maternal grandparents; and
  9. Marriage certificate of maternal grandparents.(If the son/daughter was born after 21st September 1964, the Citizenship Unit may also require documentary evidence showing that the mother was a citizen of Malta at the time of his/her birth.)
  1. Birth certificate;
  2. Marriage certificate (if applicable);
  3. Birth and marriage certificates of the individual’s ascendants to show the direct link to the ascendant born in Malta;
  4. One passport size photo; and
  5. Passport.

The person who has authority over a minor child (who is the descendant, second or subsequent generation born abroad, of an ascendant born in Malta, of a parent also born in Malta), will be required to submit the documents listed above in (e) in respect of that child together with the documents showing his/her authorization empowering him/her to submit such application.

Notes:

  • In certain cases, additional documents may be requested;
  • As from 16th April 2010, the Citizenship Unit is no longer requesting civil status certificates issued by the Public Registry of Malta in connection with a service provided by the Unit. The Citizenship Unit shall obtain the necessary certificates on behalf of the enquirer/applicant;
  • It is, however, the responsibility of the enquirer/applicant to provide the Citizenship Unit with the correct information in order to acquire the correct certificates. Although not obligatory, the presentation of a readily available marriage certificate would facilitate matters. The Unit will retain a copy of the certificate;
  • In this regard, the enquirer/applicant is kindly requested to complete Form CEA/27. Applicants will present Birth/Marriage certificates issued by foreign Authorities and local Ecclesiastical Authorities when these records are not available at the Public Registry.

How does one apply for registration as a citizen of Malta?

Persons who were:

  1. Submit the necessary documentation to the Citizenship Unit;
  2. Once the Citizenship Unit reviews the documents submitted, the applicant will verify and sign the duly completed application form; 
  3. If the applicant is a foreign spouse to a citizen of Malta, he/she and his/her Maltese spouse are required to make a joint declaration (affidavit) in order to confirm that they have been living together for a period of at least five (5) years from the date of their marriage and are still living together;
  4. The Citizenship Unit will administer the necessary oaths, including the Oath of Allegiance to the Republic of Malta*. Besides the fees pertaining to oaths, applicants would need to pay a prescribed application fee of €150.

* This requirement shall not apply to any person of full age but not of full capacity on behalf of whom an application is submitted with the authorisation of the Civil Court (Voluntary Jurisdiction).

When applying through one of Malta’s Missions abroad, the administering of the necessary oaths has to be made either before an Official from the Mission who is duly authorised to act as Commissioner for Oaths or before a person who, according to the law of the country concerned, is empowered to administer oaths.

The application will be processed by the Citizenship Unit and successful applicants will be registered as a citizen of Malta. Successful applicants will be considered citizens of Malta from the date on their certificate of registration. They will then be asked to call at the Citizenship Unit to collect their certificate against a fee of €50.

If the applicant was born abroad, the Citizenship Unit will address a letter to the Director of Public Registry so that his/her birth certificate may be registered at the Public Registry Office. Applicants must present this letter to the Public Registry along with their original birth certificate, (and an official translation in English or Maltese) or a photocopy of the certificate, duly certified by a Notary Public, an Advocate or a Legal Procurator.

Notes

  • A list is annually published in the Government Gazette which contains the full name of all those persons who were registered and naturalised as citizens of Malta during the preceding year.
  • Malta accepts dual or multiple citizenship, however, the persons concerned are advised to verify whether their country’s citizenship law permits this since the voluntary acquisition of another citizenship may lead to the loss of their current one.

Applicants who do not reside in Malta are advised to contact one of Malta’s Embassies or High Commissions for further information with regard to the procedures that they need to follow when submitting an application for registration. The contact details of Malta’s Diplomatic Representations Oversees can be accessed from the website of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade Promotion

(https://foreignaffairs.gov.mt/en/Pages/Maltese%20Diplomatic%20Representations%20Overseas/Maltese-Diplomatic-Representations-Overseas.aspx).

by Naturalisation

The Maltese Citizenship Act establishes who may become a citizen of Malta by naturalisation, provided that the applicant satisfies the relative provisions.

Article 10(1) of Cap. 188 regulates the acquisition of citizenship on the basis of residence in Malta whilst Article 11 refers to the acquisition of Maltese citizenship by minors. Ultimately, the Minister responsible for citizenship matters has the discretion to grant or refuse the application under such provisions.

Who can apply for Maltese citizenship by naturalisation on the basis of residence in Malta?

Provided that the applicant is over eighteen (18) years of age, an individual may submit an application if he/she is a:

  • Foreigner or stateless person;
  • Has resided in Malta throughout the twelve (12) months immediately preceding the date of application; &
  • Has resided in Malta for an aggregate period of a minimum of four (4) years, during the six (6) years preceding the above period of twelve (12) months;
  • Person of good character;
  • Has adequate knowledge of Maltese or English language*; and
  • Would be a suitable citizen of Malta.

* This requirement shall not apply to any person of full age but not of full capacity on behalf of whom an application is submitted with the authorisation of the Civil Court (Voluntary Jurisdiction).

Prior to submitting an application, the applicants would need to set an appointment with the Citizenship Unit so that a residence certificate may be compiled. In this regard, applicants would need to provide the Officer with (i) their current passport and (ii) all other expired passports in their possession (covering their period of residence in Malta).

The applicant would need to submit additional documents once the Citizenship Unit assesses the above certificate and confirms that the applicant is eligible to proceed with his/her application.

Application Forms

Applicants would need to fill in:

    1. CEA 6 – Form E

Submitting an application for a Maltese citizenship by naturalisation on the basis of residence in Malta

  • The applicant would submit the necessary documentation to the Citizenship Unit;
  • Once the Citizenship Unit reviews the documents submitted, the applicant will verify the content and sign the duly filled application form; 
  • The applicant would need two (2) sponsors (who are not relatives) in order to complete the application process. Their signature would need to be witnessed and countersigned by another person.

    Applicant may choose any of the following persons as his or her first sponsor:

    • A member of Parliament;
    • A judge;
    • A magistrate;
    • An advocate;
    • A notary public;
    • A legal procurator;
    • A medical practitioner;
    • A public officer not below the rank of principal;
    • A police officer not below the rank of inspector;
    • An officer of the Armed Forces of Malta not below the rank of captain;
    • A parish priest.
    The second sponsor may be any citizen of Malta who does not belong to any of the above-mentioned professions. Any citizen of Malta may act as sponsor provided that he/she did not acquire Maltese citizenship by naturalisation and that he/she is over eighteen (18) years of age.
  • Applicants would then need to submit a complete application form to the Citizenship Unit and will administer the necessary oaths, including the Oath of Allegiance to the Republic of Malta*.

* This requirement shall not apply to any person of full age but not of full capacity on behalf of whom an application is submitted with the authorisation of the Civil Court (Voluntary Jurisdiction).

Besides the fees pertaining to oaths, applicants would need to pay a prescribed application fee of €450.

The application will be processed by the Citizenship Unit and successful applicants will be naturalised as a citizen of Malta. Successful applicants will be considered citizens of Malta from the date on their certificate of naturalisation. They will then be asked to call at the Citizenship Unit to collect their certificate against a fee of €50.

If the applicant was born abroad, the Citizenship Unit will address a letter to the Director of Public Registry so that his/her birth certificate may be registered at the Public Registry Office. Applicants must present this letter to the Public Registry along with their original birth certificate, (and an official translation in English or Maltese) or a photocopy of the certificate, duly certified by a Notary Public, an Advocate or a Legal Procurator.

Who can apply for Maltese citizenship by naturalisation on behalf of a minor in Malta?

The parent or parents, who were non-Maltese at the time of their child’s birth and one or both later acquired Maltese citizenship, may submit an application on behalf of their children to be naturalized as citizens of Malta.

Notes

  • In certain cases, additional documents may be requested;
  • As from 16th April 2010, the Citizenship Unit is no longer requesting civil status certificates issued by the Public Registry of Malta in connection with a service provided by the Unit. The Citizenship Unit shall obtain the necessary certificates on behalf of the enquirer/applicant;
  • It is, however, the responsibility of the enquirer/applicant to provide the Citizenship Unit with the correct information in order to acquire the correct certificates. Although not obligatory, the presentation of a readily available marriage certificate would facilitate matters. The Unit will retain a copy of the certificate;
  • Applicants would need to present Birth/Marriage certificates issued by foreign Authorities and local Ecclesiastical Authorities when these records are not available at the Public Registry.
  • A list is annually published in the Government Gazette which contains the full name of all those persons who were naturalised as citizens of Malta during the preceding year.
  • Malta accepts dual or multiple citizenship, however, the persons concerned are advised to verify whether their country’s citizenship law permits this since the voluntary acquisition of another citizenship may lead to the loss of their current one (refer to Dual/Multiple Citizenship).

Application Forms

In the case of naturalisation on the basis of residence by adults, applicants would need to fill in:

  1. CEA 6 – Form E
  2. CEA 10- Form J (for minors)

Dual/Multiple Citizenship

When Malta became an Independent State on 21st September 1964, Maltese citizenship legislation did not allow dual citizenship except in the case of minors, who, in order to retain Maltese citizenship were required to renounce their foreign citizenship between their 18th and 19th birthday. Failing to do so they lost their Maltese citizenship on their 19th birthday. Those adults, who on the date of Malta’s independence retained any other foreign citizenship, had to renounce it before 21st September 1967. Citizens of Malta who acquired another citizenship by a voluntary act lost their Maltese citizenship automatically on acquiring such foreign citizenship.

On 1st August 1989, the dual citizenship concept was introduced to the Maltese citizenship legislation, however, this was limited to Maltese emigrants and the persons concerned had to be:

    1. born in Malta,
    2. emigrated to another country of which they became citizens of; and
    3. had spent at least six (6) years emigrated in that country.

Important changes to the said legislation were later made in 2000. Dual or multiple citizenship has now become the rule rather than the exception. As of 10th February 2000, a citizen of Malta could acquire and retain a foreign citizenship/s along with his/her Maltese citizenship. By means of such legislation, Maltese citizenship, was reacquired automatically by those who had ceased to be citizens of Malta prior to such provided that they satisfy certain criteria. If they do not, the reacquisition of Maltese citizenship would be facilitated by means of the person applying to be registered as citizen of Malta.

Has one’s position changed following the amendments made to the Maltese Citizenship Act in 2000 in so far as dual citizenship is concerned?

Section 7 of the Maltese Citizenship Act (Cap. 188) stipulates that “it shall be lawful for any person to be a citizen of Malta, and at the same time a citizen of another country.”

Hence following the amendments passed on 10th February 2000, Maltese citizens who acquire a foreign citizenship/s may retain their Maltese citizenship, whilst foreigners who acquire Maltese citizenship by registration or naturalisation may retain such citizenship together with a foreign citizenship. This is without prejudice that the foreign legislation may not allow dual citizenship for their own nationals.

Furthermore, Maltese citizens who had lost their citizenship prior to such date have automatically reacquired their Maltese citizenship if they satisfy the conditions hereunder. If not, they may reacquire it by registration.

Former citizens of Malta who do not qualify for automatic reacquisition of Maltese citizenship

Those persons who do not qualify for the automatic re-acquisition of Maltese citizenship (because prior to the 2000 amendments they either:

  1. did not spend six (6) years abroad; or
  2. they were citizens of Malta by registration or naturalisation when they acquired their foreign citizenship) would need to apply to be registered as citizens of Malta (refer to Maltese Citizenship by Registration).

What are the necessary documents required in order for the Citizenship Unit to confirm in writing that the person concerned automatically qualifies for dual citizenship?

If the person automatically qualifies for dual citizenship, he/she needs to present the following:

  • Birth certificate;
  • Marriage certificate (when applicable);
  • Father’s birth certificate;
  • Parents’ marriage certificate;
  • A certificate showing the date of acquisition of the citizenship the individual presently holds (if this was acquired by registration or by naturalisation);
  • Present passport (Maltese and/or non-Maltese); and
  • Documentary evidence showing that the person has resided abroad for an aggregate period of at least six (6) years. This should include one’s passport/s for the period/s concerned.

Automatic Reacquisition of Maltese citizenship by former citizens

In view of the said amendments, which came into effect on 10th February 2000, all those who:

  • became citizens of Malta automatically on or after 21st September 1964 by birth or by descent;
  • subsequently lost Maltese citizenship; and
  • have resided outside Malta for an aggregate period of at least six (6) years,

Automatically re-acquired Maltese citizenship and were deemed to have never lost their Maltese citizenship.

Persons who had not attained their 19th birthday on 10 February 2000

Persons, who on 10th February 2000 had not yet attained their 19th birthday and held another citizenship, apart from that of Malta, retained such citizenship as they were no longer required to renounce their foreign citizenship in order not to lose their Maltese citizenship.

Can a Maltese citizen have confirmation that he/she has reacquired his/her Maltese citizenship as a result of the 2000 amendments?

Confirmation in writing shall be given by the Citizenship Unit following the submission of the relative enquiry form and the required documentation.

If one’s previous passports were lost or destroyed, he/she may produce one of the following documents instead:

  • A residence certificate normally issued by the Immigration Authorities of the respective country (such certificates have been issued in Australia, Canada and Italy);
  • A statement showing one’s annual earnings over a number of years (for example, the Canada Pension Plan Contributor statement or the Social Security Earnings statement issued by the United States authorities);
  • A letter from his/her previous or present employer/s giving his/her employment history (this should include dates of employment engagement and termination);
  • A confirmation of one’s annual contributions paid under the National Insurance Scheme of the adoptive country (for example, the statements issued in the United Kingdom by Contributions Agencies);
  • Authorities’ confirmation of any school or college that he/she attended (if the person acquired the citizenship of his/her adoptive country when he/she was still a minor);
  • Any other document deemed acceptable by the Citizenship Unit which proves that the person has resided outside Malta for an aggregate period of at least six (6) years.

Notes

  • In certain cases, additional documents may be requested;
  • As from 16th April 2010, the Citizenship Unit is no longer requesting civil status certificates issued by the Public Registry of Malta in connection with a service provided by the Unit. The Citizenship Unit shall obtain the necessary certificates on behalf of the enquirer/applicant;
  • It is, however, the responsibility of the enquirer/applicant to provide the Citizenship Unit with the correct information in order to acquire the correct certificates. Although not obligatory, the presentation of a readily available marriage certificate would facilitate matters. The Unit will retain a copy of the certificate;
  • In this regard, the enquirer/applicant is kindly requested to complete dual enquiry form A or dual enquiry form B;
  • Applicants would need to present Birth/Marriage certificates issued by foreign Authorities and local Ecclesiastical Authorities when these records are not available at the Public Registry.

Persons concerned are advised to verify whether their country’s citizenship law permits dual citizenship since the voluntary acquisition of another country’s citizenship may lead to the loss of their current one.

for Exceptional Services by Direct Investment

With the continuously changing global dynamics and evolving geopolitics, there is an ever-growing number of highly-talented high-net-worth individuals who are willing to invest and relocate to give themselves and their family members the chance to broaden their horizons and become part of a welcoming community. Nowadays, investor interest is at an all-time high, and ideas of possible mutually beneficial partnerships keep on flourishing. This phenomenon enriches human capital and consequently attracts market leaders who can provide added value with their business baggage.

Malta is a forward-looking microstate merely 316 km2 of land at the crossroads of the Mediterranean which embraced this opportunity, ventured into this industry, and is now right in the centre of this phenomenon, creating a melting pot of business know-how, experiences, skills and funding that are positively contributing to its society, stimulating business and increasing job creation.

This granting of citizenship by naturalisation for exceptional services by direct investment is regulated by S.L. 188.05.

Eligibility Criteria

The requisites for filing an application are:

  • Provide a proof of residence in Malta for a period of 36 months, provided that this period may by exception be reduced to a minimum of 12 months, subject to an exceptional direct investment (of €600,000 and €750,000 respectively), to be effected prior the issue of the certificate of naturalisation;
  • Purchase an immovable residential property in Malta having a minimum value of €700,000 or take on a lease a residential immovable property in Malta for a minimum annual rent of €16,000, which property shall be adequate and suitable for the applicant and his dependants, for a minimum period of five (5) years from the date of issue of the certificate of citizenship;
  • Carry out an exceptional direct investment in Malta, in accordance with the Regulations (S.L 188.05); and
  • Donate, prior to the issue of the certificate of naturalisation, a minimum of €10,000 to a registered philanthropic, cultural, sport, scientific, animal welfare or artistic non-governmental organisation or society, or as otherwise approved by the Agency.

Forms

e-Residency Forms

CEA Form K

Application for a Residence Permit, for Individuals who are not Nationals of an EU Member State, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland – Economic Self Sufficiency

Download Form

CEA Form J

Application for Residence Documentation, for individuals who are Nationals of an EU Member State, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland – Economic Self-Sufficiency

Download Form

Form ID 1A

Electronic Identity Registration Form – Non Maltese Nationals

Download Form

Form ID 2

Image Capture Application Form and photos for dependents under the age of 12

Download Form

Parent’s Consent Form

This form must be completely filled in and signed by the parents, in the presence of the witness who should be fully aware of the parents’ identity.

Download Form

Rental Declaration Form

This form must be filled by the owner of the residential property indicated in the lease agreement submitted by the applicant. This serves as a confirmation of the address indicated by the applicant on the application for a residence document submitted to the Agency.

Download Form

Health Insurance Form

Download Form

Eligibility and Citizenship Application Forms

Forms R and R1

These forms include declarations made by the main applicant at Eligibility Stage (Form R) and subsequently at Citizenship Phase (Form R1). In Part A of the forms the main applicant is required to indicate his/her dependents who will be submitting an application under the programme.

Download Form R

Download Form R1

Forms S and S1

These forms include declarations made by any adult dependants forming part of the application, including the spouse. Form S is to be completed at Eligibility Stage, while Form S1 at Citizenship Stage. S.L. 188.05 lists who could be considered as a “dependant”.

Download Form S

Download Form S1

Form T

This form is to be completed on behalf of minors at Citizenship Stage.

Download Form

PDFEE Form

The PDFEE Form is required in the case of all applicants, and if applicable, any benefactors. Applicants are required to submit information and documentation regarding their family members and also pertinent information as regards their education and employment.

Download Form

SSFW Form

The form is used to declare the income, net worth, the source of funds and wealth of the main applicant and any benefactor (where applicable). An adult dependant, such as the spouse, may also be requested to complete an SSFW Form if he/she appears to contribute to the overall income and wealth of the main applicant.

Download Form

PSC Form

All applicants need to submit PSC Form. It is required in connection with the identification of the applicant, and the form needs to be certified by a duly licensed lawyer, notary public or by a Maltese consular or diplomatic officer. Authentication of the certifier is also required where necessary.

Download Form

MRQ Form

All applicants are required to submit Form MRQ. The form contains information regarding the state of health of the applicant. The form includes a section that needs to be completed by the examining physician.

Download Form

Business and Corporate Affiliations Declaration

This declaration serves to facilitate the provision of information pertaining to the applicant’s business affiliations. It may be used as a supporting document providing additional information to supplement the details presented in SSFW Form Part C.

Download Declaration

Tax Residency Jurisdiction Declaration

The Agency requires that every applicant forming part of the application and is liable to pay tax, to sign a declaration clearly listing all the jurisdictions where the individual/s is/are a tax resident.

Download Declaration

Annual Compliance Form

This form has to be filled in by the Agent and submitted to the Agency on an annual basis, coinciding with the date of the certificate of naturalisation.

Download Form

Due Diligence

The Agency gives due consideration to every element of the application process, with particular focus on due diligence. The process which has been developed and adopted by the Agency has garnered several international positive reviews. This is the result of an open-minded approach and the continuous development of internal processes to ensure that only the rightful applicants make it through the programme. The programme is not about numbers, but more about quality and attracting talent who can prove to add value to the country.

Ultimately, this is what every citizen wants, what every nation wants and what every applicant of high moral standards wants. Individuals will not feel at ease knowing that their own personal safety is compromised, or that they cannot do business properly. It benefits us, but it also benefits the applicant. An application gone wrong can jeopardise the whole industry.

The Programme has a four-tier due diligence process, which is considered the most stringent, and of the highest standard, in the industry.

First Tier

Standard KYC due diligence is carried out by both the Agency and the Agent through databases such as World-Check.

Second Tier

Clearance is obtained from the Police Authorities following thorough checks through several databases, such as Interpol, Europol and others. Any issues encountered at this stage are reported back to the Agency. It must be pointed out that any Third Country National (TCN) applicant or dependant who requires a visa to be able to visit Malta and, therefore, enter the Schengen zone, is to go through the standard Schengen visa application procedures.

Third Tier

This stage is carried out by the Agency’s assessors. The assessors have a banking and audit background who receive ongoing training in the prevention of Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing.

A completeness and correctness check of the application is carried out. This identifies anomalies in the application form that highlight any potential risk. Every kind of accompanying documentation submitted to the Agency is checked to ensure that it has been filled in correctly and that the documents are submitted in the proper format, correctly translated, and apostilled or notarised as the case may require. Where documents are missing or not in the correct format, or errors are identified, a request for submission is made to the agent representing the family applying for Maltese citizenship and the application process is paused until everything is in order.

This stage also comprises checks against world-check databases which include searches against major international sanctions, designated and denied persons lists.

The sources of funds and wealth are also reviewed at this stage to ensure that sufficient information and supporting documentation has been provided.

Fourth Tier

Two outsourced due diligence reports are commissioned from international companies on every family to ensure that as much ground as possible is covered and no stone remains unturned. These checks would include verification of all the information submitted, checks with databases, both international and local, in each of the family’s country of residence, and even discreet on the ground interviews with individuals who know the family.

Once the above processes are completed, the assessors review all the information collected both internally and externally and an internal risk assessment report is compiled using a risk matrix, which was developed by the Agency to standardise the process and ensure that every application is processed comprehensively. However, this may entail raising further questions with the applicant via the agent to seek further clarifications. The assessor may revert to the due diligence companies to obtain their views/observations on the issues raised with the applicant. This will enable the assessor to finalise the risk assessment report.

Subsequently, applications are presented during the Agency’s board meeting where a collective decision on the recommendation to be put forward to the Minister for Citizenship is agreed. The Minister’s final decision is then conveyed to the agent by means of either a Letter of Approval in Principle or a Letter of Refusal.

All employees working in the due diligence section go for an AML course to have a better understanding of what is expected of them. In addition, the employees within this section all have previous experience in either Risk and Compliance or Audit.

 

Risk Matrix

The due diligence process has evolved substantially during the past years. The Agency has developed an internal risk matrix, which ensures that every application is being examined thoroughly in a consistent manner, and that decisions are taken systematically and transparently. The matrix has seven categories, and every application is treated similarly without deviations.

Identification and verification

Identification and verification is the first category of the risk matrix and looks at how the identity of the applicants has been established and verified, while considering all the countries the applicants have resided in over the ten years preceding the application.

Business and Corporate Affiliations

The second category looks at the Applicant’s business and corporate affiliations and takes into consideration ties with offshore activity, jurisdictions and industries.

Politically Exposed Persons (PEPs)

A category in itself is where applicants are politically exposed persons (PEPs) and are or have been on sanctions or watch lists.

Source of Funds & Source of Wealth

The fourth category of the risk matrix, which today constitutes of the most significant focus of the due diligence process, looks at establishing how the family have accumulated their wealth, and from where the funds for financing the application originate. The risk assessment under this category has an even stronger focus on documented evidence, at times delving into extremely granular detail such as bank statements, articles of association, share registers and certificates of incorporation, certified copies of contracts, and transactions amongst others. Tax evasion risks are also taken into consideration.

Reputation

The applicants’ reputation constitutes the fifth category of the risk assessment matrix, taking into consideration the overall reputation observed through OSINT, reports and on-the-ground intelligence.

Legal and Regulatory Matters

We have established that the sixth category would focus on legal and regulatory matters with incremental risk factors based on any charges or convictions for criminal or civil offences, including fines at an incremental interval.

Relative Impact on the MA's Immediate Network

The six categories of risk mentioned so far are very commonly analysed within the financial sector. However, the seventh category is somewhat bespoke to the industry of CBI and consists of an analysis of the MA’s activities and the relative impact on the MA’s immediate network and society in general. This is to ensure that no stone is left unturned and to enable the team to cover any incidental area, which is deemed essential and was not covered by any of the other previous categories.

All information which is deemed necessary for the processing and due diligence of an application is required, and there is no room for negotiation or ad hoc decisions. Details of all applicants are also submitted to the Financial Intelligence and Analysis Unit (FIAU) for full transparency.

Decisions within the Agency are documented and substantiated with the required rationale, and signed off by the responsible person, to ensure transparency and accountability

Licensed Agents

Potential applicants need to make use of the services of licensed Agents who are approved and licensed by Community Malta Agency (the Agency) thereby authorising them to guide them through the whole application process and submit prospective applications under the Granting of Citizenship for Exceptional Services Regulations (SL 188.05) and Agents (Licences) Regulations (SL 188.06).

These Agents may be public accountants or auditors, lawyers, or financial advisors duly licensed by a competent Authority, after attending training organised by the Agency and satisfying such other conditions and requirements as may be set out in the guidelines issued by the Agency from time to
time.

These Agents may have applied to act either in their personal capacity or on behalf of an audit firm, a law firm, or a financial advisory firm, being a body duly registered in accordance with the applicable law and having separate legal personality; provided that such firm, a representative by the Agent, is also authorised by the Agency to act as an Agent for the purposes of S.L. 188.06. For the avoidance of doubt, such firms shall always be represented by a duly licensed Agent.

Requirements and Conditions

In order to become Approved Agents, applicants must fulfil the following requirements and conditions:

  1. have a clean police conduct certificate issued by the Commissioner of Police in accordance with the Conduct Certificates Ordinance in the thereunder prescribed Form A or its equivalent;
  2. satisfies the due diligence process carried out in respect of such person by the Agency;
  3. completes the training programme mentioned in these Regulations;
  4. is a resident of Malta;
  5. be certified, or in the case of a legal person have a representative thereof who is certified, as an Authorised Registered Mandatory (ARM) by the International Tax Unit at the Malta Financial Services Authority. The ARM certificate is needed for both the individual applying to become an Agent and also for the office/entity/law firm in case here applications are submitted on behalf of an office/entity/law firm.
  6. hold a Professional Indemnity Insurance policy with a reputable insurance company acceptable to the Agency, with a cover of not less than one million euro (€1,000,000) or such higher figure as the Agency may determine from time to time;
  7. be able to demonstrate to the Agency that he, or in the case of a legal person, that the group of which it forms part, has unrestricted access to a recognised, reputable due diligence database, and in either case, be able to provide the Agency, upon request, with the results of their due diligence procedures;
  8. submit an application form together with all requested documentation and information that the Agency may request;
  9. undertake to provide any documentation or information as may be requested by the Agency from time to time; and
  10. provide the Agency with a fixed address and an email address where any notifications under these Regulations shall be sent, and update them in case of any change thereto; a notification by the Agency to such fixed address or the email address so provided shall be deemed to have been validly affected.

All applications go through a systematic review and evaluation process, with no exceptions or a fast-track option. Agents shall not promote or mislead prospective applicants that the process may be facilitated and such practice may lead the Agency to take appropriate action, including sanctions and revocation of license.

The ESDI Handbook

The Maltese Citizenship by Naturalisation for Exceptional Services by Direct Investment (ESDI) Handbook will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of how to complete in detail any application form and the supporting documentation required for the acquisition of Maltese citizenship by naturalisation for exceptional services by direct investment. The ESDI Handbook is subject to updates according to necessities.

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